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The coronavirus pandemic has reinforced a key feature of our company culture that we’ve long understood, but which became even more obvious in the face of an unprecedented and highly challenging situation: Wincon Security is driven in every way by an outstanding group of professionals. Our people are dedicated to customer service excellence and it shows in everything they do.

As I noted in our last blog , throughout the COVID-19 crisis our employees have gone above and beyond to not only do their jobs, but to take added steps to ensure the health and safety of both our clients and their colleagues in the field. We’ve witnessed countless examples of our employees going out of their way to help Wincon Security customers create a welcoming environment across their workplaces, retail outlets, manufacturing facilities—wherever they happen to be serving. After all, we believe it’s our job to not only protect people, property and assets, but to do so in a way that reflects positively on our clients’ brands. Whether that’s in a supermarket or a super-tall condominium complex, we take that responsibility to heart.

That’s why we were delighted to receive extremely positive customer service feedback about Karen Willis, one of our fantastic security professionals. Karen exemplifies the very best qualities that our team has to offer: dedication, professionalism, excellence in her work and a selfless commitment to putting a smile on the faces of the people we serve.

In this case, the client is a Markham-based property management company with an extensive portfolio of commercial buildings across the city. Karen leads the security team at one of the client’s flagship office complexes—which has been operating at a drastically reduced capacity since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

It’s worth noting that while the province-wide focus has rightly been on mitigating the public health impact of the coronavirus pandemic, an often overlooked consequence of social distancing and stay-at-home measures is the risk to unoccupied properties. An unstaffed building is a vandal or burglar’s dream target. In other words, unoccupied properties are more vulnerable now than ever.

As our site supervisor, Karen has been responsible for coordinating security coverage for the office facility, while managing our on-site team. She was also tasked with liaising directly with the property management firm’s leadership team, keeping them abreast of potential issues or emerging security vulnerabilities as their workforce maintained operations from a distance, and then after they began returning to the workplace. As the client noted in a letter of appreciation for Karen’s work:

“[Karen] was awesome and caring to our essential workers who came to work to every day. She went above and beyond to ensure the health and safety of our team members and I am personally grateful for this.

Many times clients only informed vendors when they are not satisfied with the service they are receiving.  Rarely do they make mention when things are above and beyond, so I wanted to take this opportunity to highlight the excellent service we are receiving.”

Feedback such as this not only makes us extremely proud of team members like Karen, but reminds us of the importance of our work—especially during one of the most difficult periods in recent memory.

We believe that security professionals should not only fulfill their duties, but do so with a high degree of energy and engagement. With anxieties on the rise and people genuinely afraid to enter their workplaces or residences, if their first encounter is with a warm and caring security team member who can brighten their day while ensuring their safety and protection, then we believe we’ve achieved our goal as a security company.

So, on that note, we extend our gratitude to Karen Willis for her outstanding work and dedication to customer service. Now, with COVID-19 cases flaring across the Greater Toronto Area once again, we still have a great deal of work to do. I’m very confident that together—especially with employees such as Karen leading the charge—we can navigate any challenge we face and succeed as we adapt to this fast-changing business environment.

Winston Stewart

President and CEO

 

When the COVID-19 outbreak took hold in March, it was difficult to imagine the size and scope of the challenge that lay ahead. Industries ground to a halt as social-distancing measures forced the closure of everything from offices to recreational facilities. Businesses and their employees faced unprecedented uncertainty. Security firms such as ours weren’t spared from the widespread economic impact.

While some clients needed less of our time, many sectors called on us to do more—much more—to help them weather the coronavirus storm. Business leaders quickly realized the degree to which they needed trained security professionals to help them manage everything from store line-ups to protecting shuttered office buildings. Perhaps most importantly, those that needed additional help from Wincon Security came to understand that we could not only protect their people, property and assets, but we were also well-positioned to become an extension of their brand. Because our people are well-trained and committed to providing industry-leading service, they could rely on us to positively reflect their company values and uphold their service standards.

Specifically, they could rely on you—our employees—to make the very best of a very challenging COVID-19 situation.

By no means are we out of COVID-19 crisis mode as a second wave of the outbreak looms large. We’re likely to face more difficulties in the weeks and months ahead before we can put this pandemic behind us. But I know that because of your dedication and commitment to excellence, our company will emerge from this stronger than ever. The past six months have only proved what I already knew about each and every one of you: You care. You’re passionate about servicing our clients. You want to make your communities better by helping to make them safer. You want to help our company grow and achieve even greater success together.

Through it all, you not only showed up for work every day, but you demonstrated unbelievable engagement and professionalism. Our competitors faced widespread labour shortages, but all of you ensured that we were able to meet client demand for our services. And you did it with a smile from behind our Wincon-branded face masks. At times that meant exposing yourselves to the general public to do your jobs. But you did it without complaining because that’s what was needed.

As a business owner, I couldn’t be more proud of your hard work and commitment to becoming better at your jobs every day. You’ve proven once again that Wincon is a partner to our clients—be they on the commercial property, retail, condominium or residential sides.

Along the way we’ve taken efforts to ensure your safety in the workplace, whether it’s in the office or at client sites. That’s meant investing in personal protective equipment (PPE), sanitizers, increased cleaning of everything from our headquarters to patrol vehicles and even purchasing those aforementioned reusable Wincon masks. Rest assured, we’ll continue making the necessary investments to keep you safe and healthy on the job. Nothing is more important to us than your well-being, as well as that of our customers and partners. We hope the new workplace normal—however it continues to evolve—alleviates the need for such stringent health and safety measures, but that day could still be a long way off.

In the meantime, our strategy is focused on finding innovative ways to service our clients as the COVID-19 pandemic carries on. Many of you have shared ideas to help us find new efficiencies and service-delivery methods as we’ve worked to achieve that goal. We invite you to continue making suggestions and thinking about ways to make Wincon an even better security provider.

As a company built on service and driven by culture, we have the tools we need to make it through this pandemic. Let’s continue working together to achieve our goals and prove once again that there is no emergency situation that our team can’t handle.

Winston Stewart

President and CEO

The current emergency situation has evolved rapidly in Canada and around the world with the declaration of the coronavirus pandemic and ever-escalating measures to combat the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Our team has been closely monitoring these developments and has enacted Wincon Security’s emergency preparedness and disaster response plan accordingly. Our focus at this point is ensuring the health safety of our clients, the occupants of the retail, industrial, educational and residential facilities we protect and, of course, our employees.

These are extraordinary circumstances and we’re responding with workplace policy and procedure updates in real time. We’re in the people business and are fully prepared to meet the challenges that lie ahead. This pandemic is testing the resolve of individuals and organizations across our economy with the introduction of everything from social distancing measures to outright closures. To do our part, we’re monitoring and implementing the advice of local, provincial and federal health agencies and ensuring we go a step above and beyond to protect the people at the heart of Wincon Security.

With that in mind, we’ve implemented the following policy changes effective immediately. We are:

  • Permitting administrative staff to work remotely or from home where possible
  • Enhancing hygiene procedures across our workplace and at client sites
  • Adjusting resourcing at some facilities and shifting our guards to sites where a physical presence is required, or utilizing technology such as advanced camera systems to monitor facilities where a physical presence may no longer be necessary (e.g., office buildings whose tenants are temporarily working from home)
  • Cancelling all in-person client meetings for the time being and stopping all non-essential business travel
  • Conducting client meetings using teleconferencing platforms until further notice

As first responders entrusted with protecting the people and assets across your commercial or residential properties, we take great pride in providing high-quality customer service, no matter the situation. This one is turning out to be one of the most challenging that we’ve experienced in our organization’s 25 years of operation.

Our focus is on helping you navigate the hurdles that lie ahead in as efficient and seamless way as possible. We’ll be providing insights in the days and weeks ahead to help you manage and implement everything from data security procedures for employees forced to work from home, to tactics designed to help ensure social distancing and to restrict access to your facilities until the pandemic wanes and life can return to normal.

We believe the key to success at this point is to remain calm and educate employees, tenants and other stakeholders of their role in maintaining health and safety across your properties. This is likely going to be a protracted event that will cause considerable disruption in the coming months. Count on Wincon to be there with you every step of the way.

In the meantime, if you have questions or require assistance, please feel free to contact me directly at winston@wincon-security.com.

Winston Stewart, President and CEO

Being a retail employee shouldn’t come with constant fears over one’s personal safety and security. But that’s the reality for provincial liquor store employees in parts of Manitoba, in particular those employed at outlets in higher-risk neighbourhoods of Winnipeg.

In recent months the provincially-run liquor stores have seen a rash of brazen robberies in broad daylight. Now, the incidents have escalated with three employees facing unprovoked assaults in recent weeks, and one receiving acute medical attention in hospital as a result. Manitoba Liquor and Lotteries has closed one store in response and has taken various other measures in an effort to deter theft.

The incidents mirror those of the past two years across a handful of LCBO outlets in Toronto. In both cases, liquor boards have instructed employees not to take action to prevent shoplifting. That’s created bizarre scenes where employees and customers are literally left to stand and watch as duffel bag-toting thieves walk into a store, take their fill and leave without resistance. The union representing liquor store employees in Ontario has criticized the LCBO’s security strategy and staff training, as well as the retailer’s claim that shoplifting costs the organization less than $6 million a year in pilfered items—a figure the union says is grossly underestimated.

To be clear, the workplace policy preventing store employees from intervening is the right one. There have been far too many examples—as in the Winnipeg case—of employees being threatened, injured or having unknown liquids thrown in their direction. Taking a chance with people’s lives or safety simply to reduce the odds of having a few bottles of vodka shoplifted isn’t worth the risk.

In response, business leaders have called for action to address the issue.

“This situation is out of control, not just in our liquor marts, but also in private retail stores,” Michelle Gawronsky, president of the Manitoba Government and General Employees union, said in a written statement, as reported in the National Post

“We need an urgent summit of law enforcement, addictions and social services, public and private retailers, unions and the provincial government.”

Various other crime-prevention methods have been floated, including requiring customers to fill out forms requesting products that would then be retrieved from a store room, a la the Consumers Distributing stores of our youth. That idea was quickly rejected, likely by executives who understand that experiential retail is the future, not one that mirrors a Soviet-era supermarket shopping experience circa the Cold War. The cost of completely reconfiguring store designs to allow for controlled distribution would also be cost prohibitive.

So, why the uptick in liquor store crime? While poverty and addiction in certain regions is undoubtedly a major contributing factor, basic ease of execution is what attracts petty criminals such as the ones who boldly fill bags with easily-traded merchandise, which in many cases is flipped to fund various personal addictions. Surveillance cameras are always a useful crime-prevention tool, but in this case—and, again, with the level of criminal in question—they tend to have little impact because they only catch thieves after the fact. Many of the individuals in question have nothing to lose and little fear of going to jail.

The best approach is to have a strong, in-store security guard presence—and, in particularly risk-prone neighbourhoods, potentially even off-duty police officers—to send a clear message to thieves that they will be apprehended. These guards need to be properly trained in citizens’ arrest tactics to catch and hold thieves until police can make it to the scene.

Some Manitoba stores have also implemented bottle locks, which can work. The problem is that individuals who want to crack these theft-prevention devices will always find a way. Still, that extra step may cause them to think twice and try stealing something else instead. Or it could merely create a time-consuming inconvenience. Either way, the locks are not 100 per cent effective.

Preventing robbers from entering stores in the first place is one of the most effective strategies. While requesting identification at store entrances can create a negative experience for law-abiding customers, it does send a clear message to would-be thieves that their behaviour will not be tolerated. Managing the optics and other logistical challenges such as long line-ups during the peak holiday season or during long weekends, however, can be daunting. It’s by no means the perfect solution.

Another option is to keep high-value liquor under lock and key, requiring staff assistance for a purchase to be made. While this helps protect luxury brands, it does little to deter the smash-and-grab of low- to mid-range bottles.

Overall, the key to preventing liquor store retail theft is to customize and combine tactics, while maintaining a careful balance between employee safety, customer experience and store performance and profitability. That means tapping the latest technology and using tried-and-true security methods such as a live guard presence, as well as entrance controls when appropriate, to deter criminals before they can act. It also takes perseverance, sustained investment and an acknowledgment that security isn’t a one-time endeavour. Thieves are clever and need to understand that an organization is serious about security before they’ll move on to another target.

Otherwise situations such as the one in Manitoba will continue, putting employee safety at risk.

Winston Stewart, President and CEO

Wincon Security

The latest cybersecurity survey by the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) sheds light on the ongoing challenges that organizations of all sizes across industries face in protecting their data and networks from hackers.

According to the report, 71 per cent of Canadian organizations surveyed were the victim of some form of cyberattack in 2018. Nearly all of the respondents said that while “cybersecurity awareness training was at least somewhat effective in reducing incidents, only 22 percent conducted the training monthly or better.” Fewer than half (41 per cent) have actually mandated that training across their organizations.

Direct costs incurred in addressing these cyberattacks, as well as a negative impact on the victim’s brand, were the most damaging aspects of the incidents for affected organizations. Importantly, an earlier CIRA survey found that only 19 per cent of Canadians “… would continue to do business with an organization if their personal data were exposed in a cyberattack.” Only 48 per cent of organizations that had their data breached even reported the incident to their clients. A meagre 21 per cent made their board of directors aware that such a breach had occurred.

Meagre investments in cybersecurity

Perhaps most worrisome, a lack of resources was one of the main reasons why 43 per cent of respondents didn’t have specific systems, processes and talent dedicated to addressing cybersecurity vulnerabilities across their organization.

As the report notes:

“Canadian banks, schools, governments and businesses are still being taken down by cyberattacks, exposing customer data, paying ransoms to hackers, and losing valuable time recovering from breaches.

According to the annual Accenture Cost of Cybercrime survey, the average cost of investigating and remediating an attack among Canadian organizations last year was $9.25 million.”

A series of costly ransomware attacks targeting Ontario municipalities over the past year—not to mention companies ranging from SMEs to enterprise—underscore cybercriminals’ growing sophistication. But not in ways you may expect. The reality is the nefarious software used to extort unwitting communities and businesses is becoming more commoditized by the day. Even a novice hacker with access to the dark web can get their hands on ransomware relatively cheaply and quickly.

Hackers are becoming more sophisticated

What’s changing is how hackers are targeting organizations. Increasingly that means tricking everyone from managers to employees to open suspect attachments or visit dubious websites. From there cybercriminals can plant malware in a computer (and/or network) and wait to pounce. That process can take several months, during which time the hacker will collect information, observe behavioural patterns and then develop an attack strategy that will likely involve some form of data theft or financial extortion.

As the CIRA survey notes, more organizations than ever are taking cybersecurity training seriously. Many are mandating courses for employees and introducing new data-protection protocols. Is it helping? Definitely. But massive vulnerabilities still exist across organizations. The reason is that many leadership teams—and the security consultants they employ—are using a one-size-fits-all approach to training and compliance.

One of the greatest complaints that people have with cybersecurity is that defensive protocols tend to be so stringent they impair employees’ ability to do their jobs effectively. In some cases, they could compromise new business opportunities and in extreme scenarios, even revenue growth. When cybersecurity tools and training become too onerous to use, they’ll soon fall by the wayside. That’s why customizing that training and tailoring it to the needs of departments (or even individual employees, whenever possible) is a far more effective risk-mitigation approach.

In short, cybersecurity systems need to be designed to align with the operational requirements and work habits of real people.

 Customization is key

That’s why it’s incumbent on cybersecurity service providers to ask a comprehensive list of questions before delivering training. What are your organization’s business objectives? How do your people work? Why are your workplace policies—in particular those that address the management of sensitive data and information—drafted as they are? Can they be updated or improved to address rapidly-increasing cybersecurity risk? How can we design and implement policies that keep your business secure, while ensuring that key processes in areas such as sales or operations aren’t unduly disrupted?

Of course, these are only a tiny handful of the queries your service provider should pose. In most cases, they’ll need to dig much deeper and work with individual managers or employees to design a pragmatic strategy that makes practical sense for your organization.

We should all glean lessons from the cyber malfeasants who are making the time to take a personalized approach to digital crime. Because if they can customize their approach to data theft, network vandalism or ransomware-driven extortion, we should be doing the same when it comes to developing and implementing plans to stop them in their tracks.

Winston Stewart, President and CEO

When news broke recently that the Swedish Data Protection Authority fined a local municipality more than USD $20,000 for privacy violations, it marked the emergence of a potential new front in the struggle to balance privacy rights and security requirements.

Under the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)—sweeping legislation that governs everything from website tracking to data collection practices across the 28-member European Union and European Economic Area—the use of data gathered with the help of facial recognition and biometric software is restricted and tightly controlled. Apparently a school board in Sweden didn’t get the memo and used facial recognition software to track high school student attendance over a three-week trial period intended to test out new technology.

The school board saw the tracking software as a more efficient use of teacher’s classroom time. According to media reports, attendance-conscious educators had apparently been devoting about 17,000 hours a year to keeping tabs on their pupils. The SDPA saw the matter differently and issued the significant fine, a first for Sweden.

Tech as a security tool, but to what end? 

The European Union has taken the lead in legislating to secure privacy rights and protect citizens, just as authorities in other regions have turned to cutting-edge new technology designed to enhance protection measures for the general public. In the wake of recent shootings in Toronto, for example, the city’s community housing agency has announced plans to increase video surveillance in at-risk neighbourhoods, all to help deter crime and aid police enforcement efforts. In the United Kingdom, cities such as London have long relied on street-level surveillance to maintain safety. The U.S. government has been using biometric technology, including the fingerprinting of foreign visitors, at border crossings for years.

The challenge that arises, of course, is when governments abuse these tools. China has faced widespread criticism for its use of facial recognition and data collection programs in its western provinces to track the local Uyghur community. In other parts of the country, Beijing actively uses technology to help silence or monitor anti-government voices. Many liken the tactics to an Orwellian invasion of privacy, an effort to enforce government-sanctioned values on an unassuming populace.

If a school board in Sweden uses facial recognition technology to track students, some argue, it’s not far-fetched to expect a more widespread application of that software across society. In the hands of a trusted few there isn’t much concern. But what happens if those individuals can no longer be trusted?

Legal systems adapting to new technology 

The reality is the use of technology as a protective tool is hardly novel and, in most cases, isn’t nearly as sinister as some may contend. The big question, as with the example from Sweden, is to what degree governments will tolerate its use. Authorities in Canada are beginning to weigh in on the safety and security vs. privacy debate.

In Ontario, for example, a labour arbitrator recently ruled in Teamsters Local Union No. 230 v Innocon Inc., that a concrete delivery company (Innocon) had the right to install cameras in its trucks to help improve driver safety and highlight potential driver misconduct by recording a driver’s actions, but only in the event that the vehicle swerved unexpectedly or took some form of evasive action that could indicate erroneous or erratic driving. In the arbitrator’s view, some level of in-cab monitoring was justified because an employer’s business interests can supersede an employee’s right to privacy under specific circumstances.

Security strategies for business

Business owners should be aware that at any point, our legal landscape could shift and new laws could limit the use of biometric or facial technology when used in public spaces or workplaces. But I predict that governments will take a measured approach to balancing privacy and security concerns. It’s likely that we will see a tightening of privacy restrictions in Ontario and across Canada at some point. In the meantime, however, your focus should be on assessing your organization’s security vulnerabilities and taking an integrated approach to protecting your people and assets.

That means reviewing the plethora of tech tools available on the market and deciding which ones make sense for your organization based on its operational needs. Facial recognition technology may make sense for a retailer with several busy locations, for example, but could provide little benefit to a software development firm with much simpler security needs. Be prepared to customize your strategy and invest in security components that will make a decided impact in helping mitigate risk and advancing your organization’s strategic goals (e.g., not being robbed, having your data held hostage or seeing your commercial property or workplace invaded).

But first, take the time to understand your jurisdiction’s privacy laws. Make sure your security strategy doesn’t violate any rules when the time comes to implement cutting-edge—yet potentially controversial—security technology.

Winston Stewart, President and CEO

Wincon Security

Odds are that when most of us look for space in a commercial office tower or a unit in a condominium, little thought goes to the functionality of the building’s elevators. In fact, there’s a good chance that we don’t even think about these fast-moving pieces of infrastructure, unless we have a specific, pre-existing interest in lift operations.

It may be time to start paying attention.

As more high-rise buildings are constructed across the Greater Toronto Area—some soaring to dizzying heights of 80 stories or more—as well as in major urban centres across the country, operational challenges are becoming a more pressing concern for owners and managers of commercial and residential properties. Specifically, a flurry of recent media headlines has focused on residents left stranded when an apartment or condominium building’s entire elevator bank goes out of operation at once. Others have pointed to elevator issues in office towers where, in some cases, tenants have been unable to access their offices despite the significant bottom-line business consequences.

A challenge for mobility-impaired tenants

Other, more damaging, headlines highlight the plight of vulnerable groups of residents such as the disabled and seniors, who wind up stranded in their apartments when lifts are taken out of operation. Not only is this a massive inconvenience, it puts lives at risk when individuals with mobility or cognitive issues are unable to exit buildings in the event of a major emergency such as a fire. In other cases, such as a medical emergency, accessing those same individuals can cost precious minutes and quickly become a matter of life and death. For property owners and managers, this kind of news is not only bad for a property’s brand—negatively impacting tenant attraction and retention, and potentially even rental prices—but also represents a major liability threat.

The obvious solution is to work with a reputable elevator supplier and install only the best possible equipment, then be sure to maintain it on a regular schedule; maintenance must also be coordinated to ensure that all of a building’s elevators aren’t out of service at the same time. But far less obvious is the need to look at elevator operation as a security issue, thereby underscoring its importance.

As we see in so many residential and commercial engagements, few infrastructure-related issues generate more angst, arguments and animosity than those related to elevator functionality. We’ve literally seen fist fights break out over access to lifts when one or more are down, particularly when an elevator is put on service for moving purposes. These problems tend to be exacerbated in older buildings that have only two elevators—newer builds tend to have at least three elevators, two for passengers and one for both passenger and service use.

Looking at elevator performance through a security lens

Our recommendation is to work with your security team—whether outsourced or in-house—to develop a strategy to proactively manage elevator challenges before they arise. For example, if you know that an elevator is due for maintenance, work with your elevator service provider to schedule that servicing well before it turns into a crisis need. Collaborate with both building maintenance and security to determine times that are best suited to conducting maintenance, such as when traffic levels aren’t at their peak and when tenants aren’t attempting to move items into or out of the building. Then be prepared to revise that plan to address ongoing changes to everything from the building’s tenant composition to operational circumstances.

Next, train your guards to understand those procedures and how to implement them at a moment’s notice. That should include arming them with effective communications tools—everything from lobby signage and tenant email addresses, to talking points—designed to keep key stakeholders informed and up-to-date on the status of elevator issues and, most importantly, a timeline explaining when they’ll likely be resolved. One of the most important aspects of that training is enhancing guards’ focus on customer service. Security staff will need to understand how to defuse tenant tensions by showing empathy, while also clearly explaining the plan to address the issue at hand.

Security training is essential

Last, but definitely not least, guards should be trained in the basic operation of necessary control panels and have direct access to your elevator maintenance service provider. All too often, repairs are delayed because managers or guards simply don’t know who to call. That’s an inexcusable oversight that’s easily remedied by preparing an emergency contact list (stored digitally and in hard copy format at a concierge desk or security office) with email addresses and phone numbers for mission-critical service providers.

At a time when sustainable urban planning guidelines are calling for our cities to be built up rather than out, and with more lifts being installed now than at any time in Toronto’s history, treating this key piece of infrastructure as an afterthought is no longer an option. For commercial and residential property owners and managers, the smooth elevator operation stakes are just too high to ignore.

Winston Stewart, President and CEO

Wincon Security 

One of the most valuable lessons any entrepreneur can learn is the importance of people. Great companies aren’t just built on game-changing ideas and innovation, amazing products or industry-leading service. Without the right team in place, success is virtually impossible. On that note, it’s with great pride that I introduce the Wincon Security Employee of the Year for 2018—Syed Johar.

Syed joined the Wincon team in September, 2016, after emigrating to Canada from his native Pakistan in 2015. New to the country and seeking to build a successful career, Syed sought opportunities in the security industry and came to appreciate both the flexibility of the position, as well of the responsibility of helping property owners guard their residential or commercial assets. The availability of hours also helped Syed support his young family, including his then two-year-old son.

Wincon Security Employee of the Year Syed Johar

I should point out that over the past year we’ve put a great amount of time and effort into not only redefining our core values—which I covered in our last blog—but also determining exactly the type of employee we want to hire to help drive Wincon’s growth as we continue to solidify our firm’s reputation as one of Canada’s leading security and integration solution providers. We already have a great culture, but we embarked on a journey to figure out how we could make it even better.

We looked at the incredible employees we have on staff and analyzed the many valuable personal and professional assets they bring to the table each and every day. They are: focused, hard-working, passionate, innovative, collaborative, respectful, service-oriented. The list of adjectives is simply too long to summarize in full here. Perhaps most importantly, we confirmed what we already knew. Our people truly care, not only about our customers, but about each other. They go above and beyond to provide the kind of service they would expect if they were the ones hiring a security firm to protect their property. When a colleague is facing challenges, they lend a hand and help them solve the problem.

If a customer isn’t 100 per cent satisfied, they find a way to put a smile on that customer’s face. If one of our team members can’t resolve an issue, they escalate it immediately through our customer service response team and stay on top of the matter until it’s resolved to the client’s complete and total satisfaction. Importantly, they regularly espouse one of our most important core values—that at Wincon Security, nothing is impossible. If there’s a way to overcome a challenge or introduce a dynamic new product or service (or improve an existing one), we’ll find a way to make it happen.

In Syed, we found the embodiment of that organizational spirit. His dedication and strong work ethic are second to none. He was recently promoted to supervisor in our Mobile Division and quickly set about making his mark, connecting with his team and suggesting service improvements that we’re currently studying to potentially implement in the near future.

“I can honestly say that I love coming to work every day,” Syed says. “I feel like my contributions are truly valued and that my industry experience really matters to the team. I have an opportunity to make a difference and I love the fact that I’ve been given the responsibility to work directly with our customers to make a difference in their lives.”

Syed has told us that he’s hoping to build a long-lasting career and relationship with Wincon. The good news is that we have a reputation for attracting and retaining talent—some of our employees have been with the company for 15 years or more. That kind of retention is unheard of in our industry, and speaks to our collective commitment to training, developing and engaging our employees to build the Canadian security industry’s most dynamic employee culture. In other words, odds are that Syed will be with us for a long time, and we couldn’t be happier.

So, congratulations, Syed! You embody the core values of our organization and your enthusiasm is contagious. We can’t wait to work together in the years ahead.

Winston Stewart, President and CEO

Wincon Security 

How, exactly, do you sum up all of the many characteristics that make a company unique? That’s the exact question we asked ourselves when we set about defining Wincon Security’s mission, vision and values. Needless to say, it’s a complex task.

We spoke with our team—everyone from our supervisors to our security guards—and customers for their feedback.  Our team told us that to them, Wincon is a company built on a strong culture, that focuses on innovation at every turn and never, ever lets a challenge get in the way of making great things happen. Our customers—some of whom have been with us since our founding in 1992—told us that in a very crowded security industry, our dedication to customer service excellence and our passion for delivering value in the services we provide, makes us stand out. They told us that those factors, among many, have solidified our long-standing relationships with their companies.

When we began exploring some of the same questions ourselves, we not only took time to determine what we are, but what we want to be. As a security integration solutions provider, we’re on the leading edge when it comes to introducing new technology to our clients and weaving it into their security infrastructure and our service offering. Doing so helps us protect them from the bad actors who might threaten their property or assets. In turn, it also allows our team to provide the most comprehensive and effective service packages in the business.

Developing a coherent message about our mission, vision and values took time, but we’re very proud of the results:

 

Our mission

To protect the investments and assets of our commercial clients and residential communities as if they were our own. That means delivering outstanding, responsive service, and integrating cutting-edge technology into everything we do to help minimize security risk. 

Our vision

To make security a worry-free experience, one that enables our clients to focus on what matters most: their organization’s growth and success. We do it by providing proactive solutions and nurturing a workplace culture driven by our employees’ insights and ideas, where engagement and long-term client partnerships set us apart from the competition.    

Our values

At Wincon Security, nothing is impossible. With integrity, mutual respect, responsiveness and a focus on treating our employees and clients like family—and supporting each other’s success along the way—we can add game-changing value to the security services we deliver. 

We believe that professionalism, honesty and transparency is what makes us a trusted partner to our clients. If it’s not easy for them to do business with us, we’re doing something wrong—which explains why we always work to unlock creative solutions to any challenge. 

Clearing those hurdles takes the right people doing great things in an amazing workplace. We’re committed to providing our team with fair compensation and the very best training our industry has to offer, not to mention giving them meaningful work and the chance to use advanced technology to ‘wow’ our clients. We recognize team excellence and reward it with the opportunity for career advancement. We empower our team to embrace change, collaborate on new ideas and hold each other accountable. Being a valued partner to our clients means delivering outstanding service every time. 

Because we live and breathe these values, anything is possible.

That last part is perhaps the most important. These aren’t merely words that will sit on a proverbial desktop gathering dust. These statements embody everything that we are and that we aspire to be. If we didn’t believe we could live them, we wouldn’t be able to stand by them. As we’ve demonstrated for more than 25 years, we operate with integrity and place the utmost importance on doing what’s best for our customers, every time.

That would explain how we developed our new company tagline:

Built on service. Driven by culture.  

 

We believe this is a succinct and accurate encapsulation of who we are and what makes us a unique company. Our brand is delivering the same level of outstanding service to every customer—because we’ve all done business with companies that offer differing service tiers or simply pay more attention to one client than another, and none of us liked it. That’s something that’s just not done at Wincon.

Because we’re powered by the outstanding work of our staff, we wanted to make sure that the world knows that culture is a key part of our company foundation. Without the right people in the right places doing great work, Wincon Security simply wouldn’t be where it is today—meaning at the forefront of our industry with significant annual growth and a rapidly-increasing employee base. And, of course, absolutely none of this would be possible without the ongoing support of our loyal clientele. We’re forever grateful for your business, which is the cornerstone of our success.

At this point it’s about looking ahead to the future, enjoying more growth and working with our team and our customers to make a difference in the Greater Toronto Area. After more than a quarter century in business, it feels like we’re only getting started.

Winston Stewart, President and CEO

Wincon Security 

Residential and commercial property developers are some of the Canada’s most visionary entrepreneurs, taking incredible financial risks to build our cities and towns, filling them with homes to raise our families and constructing the buildings needed to grow our businesses. But they don’t always think security first.

When constructing a new residential or commercial development, for example, their focus tends to be on getting their buildings or home built. Makes perfect sense. But when their crews go home at night, many of these properties are left under-protected.  There are many instances when we’ve been called in to patrol a development after the property has been subject to some form of crime, be it theft or vandalism. It’s only then that we realize that the developer entrusted the protection of their multi-million-dollar investment to a single security guard.

Inadequate security coverage is common

That’s right. There are times when a lone guard is tasked with protecting an entire complex or building, despite the fact that it may cover a sprawling swath of land, and in most cases isn’t yet equipped with necessary security technology to facilitate easier monitoring. To call this a major security oversight would be an understatement.

That said, it’s not always practical to hire an entire security team to monitor a development under construction. Margins are tight in the construction phase and developers are inherently budget-conscious in their dealings. As a business owner, I understand their frugal philosophy. But it’s important to note that hiring a few guards is far cheaper than the cost of managing property damage, theft or vandalism. That’s why it’s important for development firms to be sure to take security into account when formulating their construction budgets. Doing so will help ensure that a vital consideration—security—is covered off, while avoiding surprise expenses that can negatively impact a project’s success.

Another important point to consider is site access. You may have enough guards on site, but are entry and exit points controlled? Even the most diligent guards will be forced to turn their backs and patrol different areas throughout their shift—they can’t be everywhere at once. If your development has open access points, you only invite added risk. Now, it’s often not feasible to fence in large housing projects. But by installing effective LED lighting, budgeting for ample security coverage and even installing high-definition cameras as a matter of practice from the start of a project, you can help secure peace of mind and deter would-be criminals.

Commercial property security starts with site access control

Of course, security for new developments isn’t only a nighttime consideration. Any reputable security firm should be able to work with your organization to develop a 360-degree security strategy that assesses all potential threats and vulnerabilities and takes steps to mitigate risk at all points of the day or night. During working hours, for example, it’s wise to document any trade, administrative employee or development firm representative who enters or exits the property, including the time they arrived and departed, their contact details and the reason for the visit. Understanding exactly who’s stepping foot on the property will not only provide greater access control, but will also ensure accountability—by helping to determine who was on-site and when—if an incident occurs.

The risks of allowing unauthorized visitors isn’t restricted to potential property theft or damage, of course. Poor property access control also invites dramatically increased insurance liability. If an unauthorized visitor is injured while on your property and your organization is deemed to have been negligent in securing the site, you could be on the hook for a substantial payout to people who shouldn’t have been there in the first place—not to mention hefty legal fees. While incidents such as these are thankfully relatively uncommon, when they do occur, they can be financially crippling for a cost-averse developer.

Round-the-clock condominium security is crucial

That’s particularly true in the case of high-rise condominium or office towers. There have been incidents of individuals taking cranes for a joy ride, for example. Spoiler alert: bad things happen when cranes are used in inappropriate ways by untrained operators. And let’s not forget about the Internet-driven phenomenon whereby people climb to the top of extremely tall structures and film themselves doing flips or hanging off girders for the benefit of their online followers. Again, there have been examples of people falling to their deaths when trying such stunts.

You simply don’t need to attract increased legal liability and risk by failing to secure a construction site. That’s why it’s so important to hire an experienced security firm with the resources to provide adequate, round-the-clock coverage for your development, whatever its size or scope.

Real estate markets might fluctuate and economies can be volatile, but by controlling security risk, you can at least keep the lid on otherwise manageable costs and focus on what you do best—building exciting new residential and commercial communities.

Winston Stewart, President and CEO

Wincon Security